Top 5 Places To Spend And Enjoy Your Day In Ibadan

Were you told that the social life of Ibadan, the third largest city in Africa, is boring and unexciting?! If yes, you have been told a hell of a lie! If you have been pondering lately on places you can visit in Ibadan to catch a lot of fun and have a nice time either with your family, friends or just you alone, no doubt, this article is for you! Below is a compilation of top 5 places you can spend and enjoy your day in Ibadan, the capital city of Oyo State.

Heritage Mall, Dugbe, Ibadan
Heritage Mall | National Daily

1. Heritage Mall, Dugbe– This big, beautiful and spellbinding mall is one of the most visited places in Ibadan. Located in Dugbe, the heartbeat of Ibadan, Heritage Mall can boast of shops that hold almost everything a visitor might need ranging from mobile products to writing materials. The three-storey mall also houses FilmHouse cinema, Shoprite (Africa’s leading retailer), Mr Price, a food court with three outlets of eateries, a painting shop, an exquisite club and escalators that connect the three floors of the mall. The cinema offers movies at N500 on weekdays till 6pm while on weekends, it’s N1000 for a movie. Don’t you think Heritage Mall is a wonderful place to visit? Continue reading Top 5 Places To Spend And Enjoy Your Day In Ibadan

Notable Abbreviations And Their Meanings

Important Abbreviations in Nigeria

Below are some notable acronyms/abbreviations in Nigeria and the world their meanings

* AU– African Union

* NAF– Nigeria Air Force

* NN– Nigeria Navy

* JAMB– Joint Admission and Matriculation Board

* AIDS– Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

* NPA– Nigerian Ports Authority

* ASUU– Academic Staff Union of Universities

* ASUP– Academic Staff Union of Polytechnics

* AIT– Africa Independent Television Continue reading Notable Abbreviations And Their Meanings

The History And Mystery of Bilikisu Sungbo Shrine In Ijebu Ode, Ogun State

Bilikisu Sungbo Shrine
Bilikisu Sungbo Shrine | Naijatreks

The burial place of the legendary and biblical Queen of Sheba, locally known among Yoruba people as Bilikisu Sungbo, has turned a place of worship and tourism in Nigeria. Millions of people visit annually from different parts of the world to share the mystery surrounding Bilikisu Sungbo grave-turned-shrine located in Oke-Eri, Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State, Nigeria. The historical queen, Bilikisu Sungbo, was said to have traveled all the way from Ethiopia down to Ijebu-Ode where she died and was buried. The natives of Ijebu-Ode hold strong and popular claims about the identity of the controversial Bilikisu Sungbo. They claimed that she was the Queen of Sheba mentioned in the bible to have visited the wise king Solomon at height of his powers. They also claimed that Bilikisu Sungbo was the Quranic Queen Baliqs of Ethopia (from which the name Bilikisu was derived) who visited king Sulaiman. Another source has it that Bilikisu Sungbo was a wealthy woman and the leader of a group of women potters who traveled to far away places. Also, she was believed to possess supernatural powers with which she dug ditches around villages in Ijebu-Ode. Continue reading The History And Mystery of Bilikisu Sungbo Shrine In Ijebu Ode, Ogun State

A Picture Showing Valentine’s Day Celebration in 1965, Nigeria

Valentine’s day is celebrated on the 14th of February, every year, to show affection to a person, people or loved ones by sending cards, flowers, love messages or even having fun together.

Nigerians are not left behind when it comes to celebrating special days like this. Below is a picture showing how some Nigerians celebrated Valentine’s day in 1965, a long way back! So you can see that the lifestyle of Nigerians back in the 60s, 70s and 80s was shrouded in fun, love and glamour.

Valentine' Day in Nigeria in 1965

Let us know how you celebrated your Valentine’s day; kindly share it in the comment box below. Thank you!

Gbegiri Soup- A Pathway To The Heart Of Yoruba Men

Gbegiri Soup | Dobbys Signature
Gbegiri Soup | Dobbys Signature

The Yoruba people of south western Nigeria are known for their varieties of delicious and tantalizing soups that sends the bowel yearning for a lick. The delicacies of the Yoruba people compris­es predominantly solid foods (what Nigerians call SWALLOW) like: Amala, Eba, Fufu, Iyan, etc. that are needed to be eaten with soup for sweet and easy passage down the throat. One of such soups is ‘Gbegiri‘ which is prepared with beans. Are you surprised that a soup is prepared with beans?! Do not be surprised! Gbegiri is one of the best soups in Yoruba land that helps a woman construct a pathway to the heart of a man.

Here are the ingredients needed to prepare Gbegiri soup:

* 150g of beans (brown or black eyed)
* A tablespoon of grounded crayfish
* 1 cooking spoon of palm oil
* 1 smoked Titus
* Pepper, stock cubes and salt (adequate) Continue reading Gbegiri Soup- A Pathway To The Heart Of Yoruba Men

Top 5 Traditional Dances in Nigeria

Bata Dace

Nigeria is made up of over 250 tribes which all have their peculiar cultures and traditions of which dance is among. The cultural or traditional dances of Nigerian tribes are used for so many purposes which include: unifying the members of a tribe; telling folktales or the history and traditions of a community; showcasing the wealth and strength of a tribe; celebrating; performing religious duties; entertaining and so on. Below is OldNaija‘s compilation of probably the best and most entertaining traditional dances from selected Nigerian tribes.

Ekombi Dancers
Ekombi Dancers | Global Peace Production

1. The Ekombi Dance– The Ekombi dance is peculiar to the Efik people of Calabar, Cross River state. It is a beautiful and entertaining dance in which maidens are dressed in multi-coloured attires sewn in a mini skirt and blouse form which exposes their tummy. The maidens are also decorated with beads of different colours and sizes. The Ekombi dancers whine gracefully to the rhythmical beats of the Efik drummers in the movement of ocean tides. The Ekombi dance of the Efik people shows the beauty and maturity of a woman.

Nkwa-Umu_Agbogho Dancers
Nkwa-Umu_Agbogho Dancers | Imo Online

Continue reading Top 5 Traditional Dances in Nigeria

Ibi Ugwu (Male Circumcision) In Igbo Land

Circumcision in Igbo land

The act of circumcising babies in Igbo land is an ancient culture and tradition of the Igbo people which has its origin from their traditional religions. “Circumcision is the act of removing female genitalia, or a simple fold of skin (foreskin and prepuce) that covers the head of an un-erect penis”. In ancient times, the Igbos circumcise both male and female children, but as modernization set in, the circumcision or genital mutilation of Igbo female children was stopped while that of male continued till today. Continue reading Ibi Ugwu (Male Circumcision) In Igbo Land

Oruko Amutorunwa (Pre-Destined Names) In Yorubaland

Yoruba Twins
Ibeji (Twins)

In Yoruba land, one of the most important things done when a child is born is to give the child a name. This comes after the child’s ritual birth, massage of specific body parts and other rites as well. Names are given to the child by the father, mother, grandparents (paternal and maternal) and some close relatives also. But sometimes, the circumstance of a child’s birth will automatically give the child a name. This name is known as ‘orúko àmútọ̀runwá’ (pre-destined or generic name) in Yorubaland. Continue reading Oruko Amutorunwa (Pre-Destined Names) In Yorubaland

Samuel Okwaraji- Life, Career and Death

Sam Okwaraji

Samuel Sochukwuma Okwaraji was a prolific and professional Nigerian football player who played for both international clubs and his country. He was born in Orlu, a city in Imo State, to a duty officer, Mr. David Okwaraji and a headmistress, Lady Janet Okwaraji on the 19th of May, 1964. Samuel Okwaraji attended WTC Practicing School, Enugu for his primary education and Ezeachi Secondary School, Orlu, Imo State. Sam Okwaraji also attended Federal Government College in Orlu and finally completed his studies in law in the University of Rome, Italy, but did not take up the profession after schooling. While bagging his masters in international law in the University of Rome, Samuel Okwaraji played for NK Dinamo Zagreb, VfB Stuttgart and SSV Ulm 1846 where he performed exceptionally. Continue reading Samuel Okwaraji- Life, Career and Death

Yoruba Culture and the Left Hand

Yoruba culture and left hand

The Yoruba people are one of the three major ethnic groups in Nigeria. They inhabit the south western part of the country and are the second most populated of the three major Nigerian ethnic groups, followed by the Igbos of eastern Nigeria. The Yoruba people are well known for their strong desire for peace and unity at home and in diaspora. They are also known for their rich cultures and traditions which include: lifestyle, religions, dressings, beliefs and so on. The Yorubas, also called Omo Odua (offspring of Oduduwa- the progenitor of the Yoruba tribe), cherish every aspect of their cultures and traditions; none is being overlooked or handled with less importance and care because they practice them daily.

Ethics is a vital aspect of the Yoruba culture. The Yoruba attach great importance to ethical significance because they believe that this aspect of their culture is highly essential to every individual’s life. They also believe that it will be easy for someone with good ethics to succeed in life and the other way round for the one who lacks it. Therefore, the Yoruba people use all means to teach their children good manners and morals and how to use them in the society. Some of the means they use are: storytelling, songs, poetry, oral lecturing and so on. Continue reading Yoruba Culture and the Left Hand

Nigerian Vice Presidents From 1966 Till Date

Yemi Osinbajo

Vice President  | President/Head of State | Type of Government

* Babafemi Ogundipe | Aguiyi Ironsi | Military

* J. E. A Wey | Yakubu Gowon | Military

* Olusegun Obasanjo | Murtala Mohammed | Military

* Shehu Musa Yar’dua | Olusegun Obasanjo | Military

* Alex Ekwueme | Shehu Shagari | Democratic

* Tunde Idiagbon | Muhammadu Buhari | Military

* Ebitu Ukiwe | Ibrahim Babangida | Military

* Augustu Aikhomu | Ibrahim Babangida | Military

* Oladipo Diya | Sani Abacha | Military

* Mike Akhigbe | Abdulsalam Abubakar | Military

* Atiku Abubakar | Olusegun Obasanjo| Democratic

* Goodluck Ebele Jonathan | Umaru Musa Yar’Adua | Democratic

* Alh. M. Namadi Sambo | Goodluck Jonathan | Democratic

* Alh. M. Namadi Sambo | Goodluck Jonathan | Democratic

* Yemi Osinbajo | Muhammadu Buhari | Democratic

If you find this information useful, kindly share and drop a comment below. Thanks!

Embassies in Nigeria and their Locations

Nigeria coat of arms

Algeria
Embassy of Algeria
Address: Plot 230, Etim Inyang Crescent, Victoria Island Extension, Lagos
Phone: +234 1 2624017, 2611570; Fax: +234 1 2624017

Angola
Embassy of The People’s Republic of Angola,
Address: 5, Kasumu Ekemode Street, Victoria Island, P.O. Box 50437, Falomo, Ikoyi, Lagos
Phone: +234 1 2611135, 2611702

Argentina
Embassy of The Argentine Republic
Address: 15A, Ruxton Road, Ikoyi, P.O. Box 51940, Lagos
Phone: +234 1 2690093 2690117; Fax: +234 1 2690118

Australia
Australian High Commission
Address: 2, Ozumba Mbadiwe Avenue, Victoria Island, Lagos. Phone: +234 1 2613124 2618875; Fax: +234 1 2618703
Address: ALD Building, Plot 665 Vaal Street, Off IBB Way, Maitama, Abuja Phone: +234 9 5230753-5; Fax: +234 9 5239931

Austria
Embassy of Austria,
Address: FABAC Centre, 3B Ligali Ayorinde Avenue, Victoria Island, P.O. Box 1914, Lagos
Phone: +234 1 2616081 2616286; Fax: +234 1 2617639 Continue reading Embassies in Nigeria and their Locations

Concepts of Government- Power And Authority

Political Power and Authority

Power

What is power?
Power is defined as the ability to affect someone’s behaviour through some sanctions.
(According to C. C Dibie’s Essential Government, “Power is the capacity to affect another’s behaviour by the threat of sanction. The sanctions may be negative or positive. Thus, a political leader may have the ability to control the actions of others by promising those who support him wealth or honours, or he may threaten to deny such rewards to those who oppose him. However, sanctions are used if there is non-compliance”.)

Continue reading Concepts of Government- Power And Authority

Pre-Colonial Political Administration of the Benin Empire

Pre-colonial administration of the Benin empire

The Edos of Benin inhabit the south western part of modern day Nigeria and are close neighbors of the Yorubas with whom they claim the same origin. The Benin pre-colonial system of government, like the Yorubas was monarchical. The Oba (a title used for the king of Benin) was the theoretical and political leader of the empire with absolute authority no one dares to challenge. Unlike a Yoruba king, he was not bounded by the constitution or laws of the land. He solely wielded the legislative, executive and judiciary powers of the empire. Howbeit, he was assisted in the administering the empire by a many councils and officials. The highest of the councils were the Uzama who advised the King on important matters concerning the affairs of the empire. But unlike a Yoruba king, he was not subjected to their advice and decisions; he could heed to them and dispose them at will. Besides advising the King, the Uzama were also saddled with the responsibility of crowning a new king (the eldest surviving son of the previous king).

Apart from the Uzama, there were a number of officials who helped the Oba in administering the empire. These included officials like ‘Unwagwe’ and ‘Eribo’ who were in charge of the empire’s trade. They monitored the flow of goods in the empire and advice the king on how the economy of the empire can be improved. There were also the gold and brass-smiths that took care of the empire’s craft and industry. Other notable and important officials were the ‘Ezomo’, ‘Ebohon’, ‘Iyasere’ and the ‘Ologbosere’, the chief priest. All these officials had specific roles they played in the administration of the empire.

Furthermore, the Benin Empire was divided into two classes; they were the nobles and the commoners. Traditional chiefs and administrative officials were mostly chosen from the noble class. These included: the ‘Iwebo’ who were in charge of the regalia; the ‘Ibiwe’ who supervised the king’s harem and the ‘Iwagwe’ who provided the king with personal attendants. On the other hand, the commoners were not involved in the administration of the empire. Their main concern was providing food for their communities. Each of the commoners owns a piece of land he/she cultivated. They were also hired by the nobles to work on their farms for a period of time in return for money, a piece of land or sometimes cancellation of debts.

 

References:

  • Ola Abiola; A Textbook of West African History; 3rd ed.; Ado-Ekiti; Omolayo Standard Press & Bookshops co. (Nig.) Ltd.; 1984

Idanre Hill- Heights of Natural Wonders

Idanre Hills

Idanre hill, also known as Oke-Idanre, is one of the leading natural tourist destinations in Nigeria. The Idanre hill is located in Idanre town which is about 24 kilometers southwest of Akure, the capital city of Ondo State, Nigeria. The beautiful and wonderful Idanre hill has been a home to the people of Idanre for over 150 years. History of Idanre has it that the early settlers of the Idanre people lived high up in the hill in a place now known as Old Oke-Idanre.
Continue reading Idanre Hill- Heights of Natural Wonders

The Osogbo War of 1840

Osogbo map

After the Fulanis systematically captured and made Ilorin their territory, they sacked the old Oyo Empire in 1835/1636. They were still not satisfied with their victory; they wished to extend their rule deep into the heart of Yoruba land. Thus in 1840, they set to capture Osogbo, a Yoruba town. The Fulanis, under the command of Ali, the Hausa balogun of Ilorin, laid siege on Osogbo. When the king of Osogbo realized that the Ilorins were too strong for the Osogbo army, he summoned the Ibadans for help. Ibadan immediately sent some auxiliaries to Osogbo under the command of Obele alias Mobitan, and Alade Abimpagun. As this force could not stop the Ilorins, another contingent was sent to Osogbo under a more experienced leader. But still the Ilorins won every battle and gained more ground. Continue reading The Osogbo War of 1840

The Mugbamugba War- Second Attempt of a Failed Expulsion

Fulani Warriors

After Are-Ona-Kakanfo Afonja was murdered and Ilorin was seized by the Fulani Jamma, Alimi (the son of Abdul Salam) became the first Fulani ruler of Ilorin not with the title of Oba or Baale but Emir which solidifies that the total control of Ilorin, a Yoruba town had gone to the Fuanis. In a bid to restore the control of Ilorin in the hands of the Yorubas, Toyeje, the Baale of Ogbomoso and the new Are-Ona-Kakanfo, led an attack on Ilorin to expel the Fulanis, but unfortunately, he failed drastically. After sometime, between the months of March and April (when locus fruit i.e Igba was ripe for harvest), another attempt was made by the Yorubas to chase the intruding Fulanis out of Ilorin but failed again. Continue reading The Mugbamugba War- Second Attempt of a Failed Expulsion

List of Radio Stations in Lagos State (With Frequencies)

Radio Stations in Nigeria

Below is the list of radio stations in Lagos state with frequencies and locations. [Updates are welcomed, kindly add new radio station(s) in the comment box below]

* 88.9 – Brilla FM – Sports Broadcast only

* 89.7 – Eko FM, Ikeja

* 90.9 – Top Radio FM

* 92.3 – Inspiration FM

* 93.7 – Rhythm FM

* 95.1 – Wazobia FM

* 92.9 – Bond FM

* 95.7 – LASU Radio (Lagos State University, Ojo, Lagos) Continue reading List of Radio Stations in Lagos State (With Frequencies)

Definition, Characteristics and Types of Sovereignty

Government Studies on OldNaija

Definition of Sovereignty

What is Sovereignty?
Sovereignty is derived from the Latin word “Superanus” which means supreme or paramount.

Sovereignty is the supreme authority and power of a state to make and enforce laws/policies within its area of jurisdiction. The state exercise its power and authority in any way it can [either De facto or De Jure (they will be explained below)] without any means of external interference or control. The French philosopher, Jean Bodin (1530-1590), propounded the idea of sovereignty his publication of “The Republic” in 1576.

 

Continue reading Definition, Characteristics and Types of Sovereignty

Public Holidays in Nigeria

Public holidays in Nigeria

Below is the list of public holidays observed in Nigeria.

* New Year’s Day- 1 January

* Workers’ Day- 1 May

* Children’s Day- 27 May

* Democracy Day- 29 May

* Independence Day- 1 October

* Christmas Day- 25 December Continue reading Public Holidays in Nigeria

List Of Radio Stations In Oyo State (With Frequencies And Location)

Radio Stations in Nigeria

Below is the list of Radio stations in Oyo State and her capital, Ibadan. Frequencies and location included.

  • 89.1 – Lead City University Campus Radio FM, Ibadan – Lagos Toll Gate, Ibadan
  • 90.1 – Space FM, 136, Liberty Road, Ibadan (1st Trilingual Radio Station in Nigeria)
  • 91.5 – Star FM, Secretariat, Ibadan
  • 92.1 – Ajilete FM, Gambari, Ogbomoso
  • 92.5 – Impact Business Radio, Akobo, Ibadan (Nigeria’s first Business Radio)
  • 92.9 – Royal Root FM, Jericho Area, Ibadan
  • 93.5 – Premier FM (FRCN), Dugbe, Ibadan

Continue reading List Of Radio Stations In Oyo State (With Frequencies And Location)

President Babangida’s Annulment Speech of June 12,1993 Presidential Election

Ibrahim Babangida
President Ibrahim Babangida

Here is President Ibrahim Babangida’s speech annulling the presidential election of June 12, 1993.

 

Fellow Nigerians:

I address you today with a deep sense of world history and particularly of the history of our great country. In the aftermath of the recently annulled Presidential Election, I feel, as I believe you yourself feel, a profound sense of disappointment at the outcome of our last efforts at laying the foundation of a viable democratic system of government in Nigeria.

I therefore wish, on behalf of myself and members of the National Defence and Security Council and indeed of my entire administration, to feel with my fellow countrymen and women for the cancellation of the election. It was a rather disappointing experience in the course of carrying through the last election of the transition to civil rule programme.

Nigeria has come a long way since this administration assumed power and leadership about eight years ago. In the attempt to grapple with the critical and monumental problems and challenges of National existence and social progress, this administration inaugurated and pursued sound and justifiable policies and programmes of reform. Continue reading President Babangida’s Annulment Speech of June 12,1993 Presidential Election

Real Account Of The June 12 1993 Presidential Election

June 12 1993 Presidential Election

Here we go behind the historic presidential election of June 12, 1993 in Nigeria. This election was considered to be the freest and fairest election in the annals of Nigerian history. What led to this election? What was this election all about? What were the consequences of this election? Below are answers to these worth-asking questions.

On the 31st of December, 1983, the military aborted the second attempt of Alahji Sheu Shagari to run a democratic government due to gross electoral misconducts that happened during the election. The military seized the power in a bloodless coup and installed Major-General Mohammadu Buhari as the Head of State and the Commander-In-Chief of the armed forces. Realizing Buhari’s administration had no intention of returning power to the democratic government, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida, the Chief of Army Staff to Maj.-Gen. Buhari, seized the power in a bloodless coup on the 27th of August, 1985 and instantly began to plan the transition to civil rule programme. Continue reading Real Account Of The June 12 1993 Presidential Election

Pre-Colonial Political System in Igboland

Igbo pre-colonial administration

The Igbo pre-colonial political system was described by many scholars as an ‘acephalous political system‘ which can be translated as ‘a leaderless or chiefless political system’. This term is suitable for describing the Igbo pre-colonial political system because it was decentralized and based on village and direct democracy where everyone in the village has the authority to contribute in decision making. Each Igbo village was seen as a political unit inhabited by related families who were bounded by common beliefs and origin. Each family head in the village held the ‘Ofo‘ title and altogether formed the council of elders. The council of elders presided over important issues on the village’s welfare, safety, development and so on. Among the council of elders, one was recognized as the most senior to others. He was the ‘Okpara‘. He could call for and adjourn a meeting, and could also give judgements as well.  Continue reading Pre-Colonial Political System in Igboland

The Reign of Bashorun Gaa in Old Oyo Empire

Map of Old Oyo Kingdom

When Alaafin Labisi took over the throne from the previous (late) Alaafin, Onisile, in 1750, he appointed Gaa as his Bashorun, the head of Oyomesi (7 hereditary kingmakers). During Alaafin Labisi’s reign, the old Oyo Empire, also known as Oyo-Ile, became so powerful and earned the respect of other kingdoms in Yorubaland. History has it in profile that Alaafin Labisi collected tributes from faraway kingdoms of Dahomey, Popo and Ashanti even though his reign was very short, and more than half of the kingdoms and villages in Yorubaland (over 6000) fell under the political umbrella of Oyo-Ile. This thus made the old Oyo Empire a political and military colossus in Yorubaland.

Continue reading The Reign of Bashorun Gaa in Old Oyo Empire

Concepts of Government- Legitimacy

Government Studies on OldNaija

Definition of Legitimacy

The word legitimacy is coined from the Latin word “legitimus” which means according to law. Therefore, legitimacy can be defined as the recognition and acceptance which the citizens give their leaders to rule them. For a government to rule successfully in a state, it must enjoy the full support and popular acceptance of the electorates or citizens. This is the reason why legitimacy/ political legitimacy remain an important features of a government. A legitimate government comes to power through the consent of the people by voting it in. Many people believe that legitimacy cannot be found in a coercive government (military government). However, the military can enjoy legitimacy by making popular government policies. In a legitimate government, obedience is not based on fear of sanctions but on loyalty to the ruler and the state.

Continue reading Concepts of Government- Legitimacy

Characteristics And Functions Of Government

 

Below are the major Characteristics/Features and Functions of the Government in a State

Characteristics of Government

1. Constitution– This is a major characteristic of a government. The government make a set of agreed rules which guides it in the administration of the state.

2. Periodic Change– A government is meant to change after a specific period of time. No government is permanent, particularly a democratic or elective government which changes through periodic election.

3. Legitimacy– A government must enjoy the support of the people.

4. Revenue– The government make revenue in different ways to enhance its administration

5. Political Power– The government must posses political power which is a tool of rooting orderliness in a state. Continue reading Characteristics And Functions Of Government

Ministers in Nigeria And Their Portfolios (Jonathan’s Administration- July 2011)

Goodluck Jonathan Ministers

Here is the list of ministers during the administration of President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan.

 

MINISTRYMINISTERSTATE

* Agric and Natural Resources (State)- Bukar Tijani- Borno

* Attorney General- Justice Mohammed Bello Adoke- Kogi

* Aviation- Stella Oduah-Ogiemwonyi- Anambra

* Defence Bello H. Mohammed- Kebbi

* Defence (State)Erelu Olusola Obada- Osun

* Education- Ruqayyatu Rufai- Jigawa

*FCT (State)- Olajumoke Akinjide-Oyo

* Federal Capital Territory- Bala Mohammed- Bauchi

* Finance- Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala- Abia

* Finance (State)- Yerima Lawal Ngama- Yobe

* Foreign Affairs- Olugbenga Ashiru- Ogun

* Foreign Affairs (State)- Viola Onwuliri- Imo

* Health- Onyebuchi Chukwu- Ebonyi

*Information- Labaran Maku- Nasarawa

* Communication Technology- Mrs. Omobola Johnson- Ondo

* Interior- Comrade Abba Moro- Benue

* Labour- Emeka Wogu- Abia

* Mines and Steel Development- Mohammed Musa Sada- Katsina

* National Planning- Shamsudeen Usman- Kano

* Niger Delta Affairs- Godsday Orubebe- Delta

* Niger Delta Affairs (State)- Zainab Ibrahim Kuchi- Niger

* Petroleum- Diezani Alison-Madueke- Bayelsa

* Police Affairs- Caleb Olubolade- Ekiti

* Power- Chinedu Nebo took over from Bart Nnaji- Enugu

* Science and Technology- Ita Okon Bassey Ewa- Akwa Ibom

* Sports- Yusuf Sulaiman- Sokoto

* Trade and Investment- Olusegun O. Aganga- Lagos

* Trade and Investment (State)- Samuel Ioraer Ortom- Benue

* Transport- Idris A.Umar- Gombe

* Women Affairs- Zainab Maina- Adamawa

* Works- Mike Onolememen- Edo

* Works (State)- Bashir Yugudu- Zamfara

* Youth Development- Bolaji Abdullahi- Kwara

 

If you find this information useful, kindly share and drop a comment below.

Ministers in Nigeria And Their Portfolios (Buhari’s Administration- 2015)

Muhammadu Buhari's Ministers

Below is the list of the newly inaugurated ministers (and their portfolios) of President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration (2015)

1. Abdulrahman Dambazau (Kano)- Minister of Interior

2. Kayode Fayemi (Ekiti)- Minister of Solid Minerals

3. Adamu Adamu (Bauchi)- Minister of Education

4. Barr. Adebayo Shittu (Oyo)- Minister of Communication

5. Chris Ngige (Anambra)- Minister of Labour & Employment

6. Sen Hadi Sirika (Katsina)- Minister of State, Aviation

7. Prof Anthony Onwuka (Imo)- Minister of State, Education

8. Solomon Dalong (Plateau)- Minister for Youth and Sports

9. Abubakar Malami (Kebbi)- Minister of Justice & Attorney-General

10. Aisha Alhassan (Taraba)- Minister of Women Affairs

11. Babatunde Fashola (Lagos)- Minister of Power, Works and Housing

12. Suleiman Adamu (Jigawa)- Minister of Water Resources

13. Kemi Adeosun (Ogun)- Minister of Finance

14. Ibe Kachikwu (Delta)- Minister of State, Petroleum

15. Osagie Ehanire (Edo)- Minister of State, Health

16. Audu Ogbeh (Benue)- Minister of Agriculture

17. Udo Udo Udoma (Akwa Ibom)- Minister of Budget & National Planning

18. Lai Mohammed (Kwara)- Minister of Information

19. Amina Mohammed (Gombe)- Minister of Environment

20. Ibrahim Usman Jibril (Nasarawa)- Minister of State, Environment

21. Hajia Khadija Bukar Ibrahim (Yobe)- Minister of State, Foreign Affairs

22. Cladius Omoleye Daramola (Ondo)- Minister of State, Niger Delta

23. Ogbonaya Onu (Ebonyi)- Minister of Science and Technology

24. Barr James Ocholi (Kogi)- Minister of State, Labour & Employment

25. Dan Ali (Zamfara)- Minister of Defence

26. Geoffrey Onyema (Enugu)- Minister of Foreign Affairs

27. Zainab Ahmed (Kaduna)- Minister of State Budget and National Planning

28. Okechukwu Enelamah (Abia)- Minister of Trade, Investment & Industry

29. Muhammadu Bello (Adamawa)- Minister of Federal Capital Territory

30. Heineken Lokpobiri (Bayelsa)- Minister of State, Agriculture

31. Aisha Abubakar (Sokoto)- Minister of State, Trade & Investment

32. Mustapha Baba Shehuri- (Bornu) Minister of State, Power

33. Rotimi Amaechi- (Rivers) Minister of Transportation

34. Pastor Usani Uguru (Cross River)- Minister of Niger Delta

35. Abubakar Bawa Bwari (Niger)- Minister of State, Solid Minerals

36. Isaac Adewole (Osun)- Minister of Health

***** President Muhammadu Buhari- Minister of Petroleum *****

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The Independence Speech of Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa on October 1st, 1960

Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa giving a speech on Independence day
Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa giving a speech on Nigeria’s Independence day

Below is the speech delivered by the Nigerian Prime Minister, Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, during the celebration of Nigeria’s independence on October 1st 1960 at the Tafawa Balewa Square in Lagos.

 

“Today is Independence Day. The first of October 1960 is a date to which for two years every Nigerian has been eagerly looking forward. At last, our great day has arrived, and Nigeria is now indeed an independent sovereign nation. Continue reading The Independence Speech of Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa on October 1st, 1960