Category Archives: History

Read the best articles on Nigerian history and feel like you’re part of it.

Pre-Colonial Political Administration of the Benin Empire

Pre-colonial administration of the Benin empire

The Edos of Benin inhabit the south western part of modern day Nigeria and are close neighbors of the Yorubas with whom they claim the same origin. The Benin pre-colonial system of government, like the Yorubas was monarchical. The Oba (a title used for the king of Benin) was the theoretical and political leader of the empire with absolute authority no one dares to challenge. Unlike a Yoruba king, he was not bounded by the constitution or laws of the land. He solely wielded the legislative, executive and judiciary powers of the empire. Howbeit, he was assisted in the administering the empire by a many councils and officials. The highest of the councils were the Uzama who advised the King on important matters concerning the affairs of the empire. But unlike a Yoruba king, he was not subjected to their advice and decisions; he could heed to them and dispose them at will. Besides advising the King, the Uzama were also saddled with the responsibility of crowning a new king (the eldest surviving son of the previous king).

Apart from the Uzama, there were a number of officials who helped the Oba in administering the empire. These included officials like ‘Unwagwe’ and ‘Eribo’ who were in charge of the empire’s trade. They monitored the flow of goods in the empire and advice the king on how the economy of the empire can be improved. There were also the gold and brass-smiths that took care of the empire’s craft and industry. Other notable and important officials were the ‘Ezomo’, ‘Ebohon’, ‘Iyasere’ and the ‘Ologbosere’, the chief priest. All these officials had specific roles they played in the administration of the empire.

Furthermore, the Benin Empire was divided into two classes; they were the nobles and the commoners. Traditional chiefs and administrative officials were mostly chosen from the noble class. These included: the ‘Iwebo’ who were in charge of the regalia; the ‘Ibiwe’ who supervised the king’s harem and the ‘Iwagwe’ who provided the king with personal attendants. On the other hand, the commoners were not involved in the administration of the empire. Their main concern was providing food for their communities. Each of the commoners owns a piece of land he/she cultivated. They were also hired by the nobles to work on their farms for a period of time in return for money, a piece of land or sometimes cancellation of debts.

 

References:

  • Ola Abiola; A Textbook of West African History; 3rd ed.; Ado-Ekiti; Omolayo Standard Press & Bookshops co. (Nig.) Ltd.; 1984

The Osogbo War of 1840

Osogbo map

After the Fulanis systematically captured and made Ilorin their territory, they sacked the old Oyo Empire in 1835/1636. They were still not satisfied with their victory; they wished to extend their rule deep into the heart of Yoruba land. Thus in 1840, they set to capture Osogbo, a Yoruba town. The Fulanis, under the command of Ali, the Hausa balogun of Ilorin, laid siege on Osogbo. When the king of Osogbo realized that the Ilorins were too strong for the Osogbo army, he summoned the Ibadans for help. Ibadan immediately sent some auxiliaries to Osogbo under the command of Obele alias Mobitan, and Alade Abimpagun. As this force could not stop the Ilorins, another contingent was sent to Osogbo under a more experienced leader. But still the Ilorins won every battle and gained more ground. Continue reading The Osogbo War of 1840

The Mugbamugba War- Second Attempt of a Failed Expulsion

Fulani Warriors

After Are-Ona-Kakanfo Afonja was murdered and Ilorin was seized by the Fulani Jamma, Alimi (the son of Abdul Salam) became the first Fulani ruler of Ilorin not with the title of Oba or Baale but Emir which solidifies that the total control of Ilorin, a Yoruba town had gone to the Fuanis. In a bid to restore the control of Ilorin in the hands of the Yorubas, Toyeje, the Baale of Ogbomoso and the new Are-Ona-Kakanfo, led an attack on Ilorin to expel the Fulanis, but unfortunately, he failed drastically. After sometime, between the months of March and April (when locus fruit i.e Igba was ripe for harvest), another attempt was made by the Yorubas to chase the intruding Fulanis out of Ilorin but failed again. Continue reading The Mugbamugba War- Second Attempt of a Failed Expulsion

President Babangida’s Annulment Speech of June 12,1993 Presidential Election

Ibrahim Babangida
President Ibrahim Babangida

Here is President Ibrahim Babangida’s speech annulling the presidential election of June 12, 1993.

 

Fellow Nigerians:

I address you today with a deep sense of world history and particularly of the history of our great country. In the aftermath of the recently annulled Presidential Election, I feel, as I believe you yourself feel, a profound sense of disappointment at the outcome of our last efforts at laying the foundation of a viable democratic system of government in Nigeria.

I therefore wish, on behalf of myself and members of the National Defence and Security Council and indeed of my entire administration, to feel with my fellow countrymen and women for the cancellation of the election. It was a rather disappointing experience in the course of carrying through the last election of the transition to civil rule programme.

Nigeria has come a long way since this administration assumed power and leadership about eight years ago. In the attempt to grapple with the critical and monumental problems and challenges of National existence and social progress, this administration inaugurated and pursued sound and justifiable policies and programmes of reform. Continue reading President Babangida’s Annulment Speech of June 12,1993 Presidential Election

Real Account Of The June 12 1993 Presidential Election

June 12 1993 Presidential Election

Here we go behind the historic presidential election of June 12, 1993 in Nigeria. This election was considered to be the freest and fairest election in the annals of Nigerian history. What led to this election? What was this election all about? What were the consequences of this election? Below are answers to these worth-asking questions.

On the 31st of December, 1983, the military aborted the second attempt of Alahji Sheu Shagari to run a democratic government due to gross electoral misconducts that happened during the election. The military seized the power in a bloodless coup and installed Major-General Mohammadu Buhari as the Head of State and the Commander-In-Chief of the armed forces. Realizing Buhari’s administration had no intention of returning power to the democratic government, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida, the Chief of Army Staff to Maj.-Gen. Buhari, seized the power in a bloodless coup on the 27th of August, 1985 and instantly began to plan the transition to civil rule programme. Continue reading Real Account Of The June 12 1993 Presidential Election

Pre-Colonial Political System in Igboland

Igbo pre-colonial administration

The Igbo pre-colonial political system was described by many scholars as an ‘acephalous political system‘ which can be translated as ‘a leaderless or chiefless political system’. This term is suitable for describing the Igbo pre-colonial political system because it was decentralized and based on village and direct democracy where everyone in the village has the authority to contribute in decision making. Each Igbo village was seen as a political unit inhabited by related families who were bounded by common beliefs and origin. Each family head in the village held the ‘Ofo‘ title and altogether formed the council of elders. The council of elders presided over important issues on the village’s welfare, safety, development and so on. Among the council of elders, one was recognized as the most senior to others. He was the ‘Okpara‘. He could call for and adjourn a meeting, and could also give judgements as well.  Continue reading Pre-Colonial Political System in Igboland

The Reign of Bashorun Gaa in Old Oyo Empire

Map of Old Oyo Kingdom

When Alaafin Labisi took over the throne from the previous (late) Alaafin, Onisile, in 1750, he appointed Gaa as his Bashorun, the head of Oyomesi (7 hereditary kingmakers). During Alaafin Labisi’s reign, the old Oyo Empire, also known as Oyo-Ile, became so powerful and earned the respect of other kingdoms in Yorubaland. History has it in profile that Alaafin Labisi collected tributes from faraway kingdoms of Dahomey, Popo and Ashanti even though his reign was very short, and more than half of the kingdoms and villages in Yorubaland (over 6000) fell under the political umbrella of Oyo-Ile. This thus made the old Oyo Empire a political and military colossus in Yorubaland.

Continue reading The Reign of Bashorun Gaa in Old Oyo Empire

The Independence Speech of Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa on October 1st, 1960

Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa giving a speech on Independence day
Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa giving a speech on Nigeria’s Independence day

Below is the speech delivered by the Nigerian Prime Minister, Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, during the celebration of Nigeria’s independence on October 1st 1960 at the Tafawa Balewa Square in Lagos.

 

“Today is Independence Day. The first of October 1960 is a date to which for two years every Nigerian has been eagerly looking forward. At last, our great day has arrived, and Nigeria is now indeed an independent sovereign nation. Continue reading The Independence Speech of Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa on October 1st, 1960

How the Independence of Nigeria was Celebrated on Saturday, 1st of October, 1960 [With Videos]

Video of independence celebration in Nigeria, 1960​

The atmosphere was filled with joy and anxiety as excited Nigerians stormed the Tafawa Balewa Square (TBS) in Lagos to partake in the celebration of the independence of Nigeria on Saturday, 1st of October, 1960. Amongst the crowd were students, cultural dancers, acrobats, masquerades and others who were all eager to paint the celebration red with their performances. Policemen stood in bands in different key places across the square to prevent or suppress any form of unwanted intrusion. It was a wonderful sight to behold. Continue reading How the Independence of Nigeria was Celebrated on Saturday, 1st of October, 1960 [With Videos]

The Egba- Dahomey War (1851-1864)

Dahomen Women Warriors
Dahomen Women Warriors (Amazon Women)

The Egba-Dahomey war, as the name suggests, was a war that broke out between the two neighboring kingdoms of Egba and Dahomey (now the Republic of Benin) over territorial expansion caused by the quest of the latter to stabilize her economy. The Egba-Dahomey war was the third of the destructive wars that plagued the Yoruba nation in the nineteenth century, proceeding the Owu-Ife war: 1821-1828; and the 1840 Osogbo war. Continue reading The Egba- Dahomey War (1851-1864)

The Ibadan All-Nigerian Constitutional Conference of 1950

Nigerian Map

On the 9th of January, 1950, delegates from the northern, eastern and western regions of Nigeria met as a body in Ibadan to discuss issues on the new constitution Sir Macpherson was drafting (Macpherson constitution of 1951). Continue reading The Ibadan All-Nigerian Constitutional Conference of 1950

The Richards Constitution of 1946

Constitution Of Nigeria

Governor Bernard Bourdilloun succeeded Sir Hugh Clifford as the Governor General of Nigeria in 1939 and later left the office in 1945. In 1939, while still in power, he turned the Northern and Southern Protectorates into provinces and divided the Southern province into Eastern and Western provinces, while the Northern province remained untouched. Continue reading The Richards Constitution of 1946

Berlin Conference And The Partition of West Africa

Berlin Conference

In the due course to get a share of the African continent, all European nations participating in the struggle to have a colony in Africa had lost their decency and orderliness in the run. The tension and clashes among these competitors was boiling at its hottest degree. It was at that time that Otto Von Bismarck, a German Chancellor, convened a meeting at Berlin (Berlin Conference) with the purpose of resolving the disputes among the competitors without the use of arms. Continue reading Berlin Conference And The Partition of West Africa

Lagos Times and Gold Coast Colony Advertiser

Lagos Times And Gold Coast Advertiser_OldNaija

The Lagos Times and Gold Coast Colony Advertiser was the third newspaper established in Nigeria. It succeeded Anglo African of Robert Campbell and Iwe Irohin of Rev. Henry Townsend. The newspaper was established on Wednesday, 10th November, 1880 by Mr. Richard Olamilege Beale Blaize and was edited by Mr. Andrew M. Thomas and Mojola Agbebi. Continue reading Lagos Times and Gold Coast Colony Advertiser

Telephone Conversation Between President John F Kennedy and Prime Minister Abubakar Tafawa Balewa On August 23, 1963

John F Kennedy conversation with Tafawa Balewa

John F Kennedy conversation with Tafawa Balewa

(John F Kennedy and Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa’s Phone Conversation in Text)

On Friday, August 23, 1963, the American President, John F Kennedy, made a phone call to the Nigerian Prime Minister, Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, via the Syncom Communications Satellite . The conversation lasted for 2 minutes and 19 seconds. In the conversation, the two leaders exchanged pleasantries and talked about the boxing match in which the Nigerian middle weight boxer, Dick Tiger, defeated America’s Gene Fulmer. This conversation symbolises the long time intimacy that exist between the United States of America and Nigeria.

Here is the real conversation in written form (real audio form below)

PRIME MINISTER: We congratulate you heartily Mr President for this very big achievement.

PRESIDENT KENNEDY: I hope we will be seeing you back in the United States and that all goes well for your country and your people.

PRIME MINISTER: Thank you.

PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Very good wishes Prime Minister and we look forward to having Dick Tiger come over here.

PRIME MINISTER: It was indeed a very great day for us when Dick Tiger beat the American, Gene Fulmer.

PRESIDENT KENNEDY: I know we watch those things over here. Well, we wish you good luck, regards from the people of the United States to the people of Nigeria

PRIME MINISTER: Mr. President, I would be very happy if you would convey our greetings and all the best wishes to the people of United States.

PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Thank you, Prime Minister, and we look forward to seeing you back at the White House again someday.

PRIME MINISTER: It is my intention to visit the United States very soon, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Good. Thank you, Mr. Prime Minister, and good bye.

Here is the audio recording of the conversation

http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHA-211-003.aspx#.T16zClJnoBU.facebook

Image, text and the audio was provided by the JKF Library: Conversation with Prime Minister Balewa of Nigeria via Syncom satellite, 23 August 1963

Iwe Irohin- The First Newspaper In Nigeria

Henry Townsend

In the 1840s, the missionaries of the Presbyterian Church began to arrive in Nigeria. They settled in an area known as English Town in Calabar. Among these missionaries was Rev. Henry Townsend who later moved to Abeokuta in the 1850s. In Abeokuta, he established a printing press in 1854 which he used, five years later, to publish the first newspaper in Nigeria called “Iwe Irohin Fun Awon Ara Egba Ati Yoruba.”
Continue reading Iwe Irohin- The First Newspaper In Nigeria

The Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture (FESTAC 77)

Festac77

The Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture, popularly known as Festac 77, was a boisterous cultural celebration which took place in Lagos, Nigeria, starting from January 15 1977 to February 12 1977. The festival celebrated the cultures and traditions of Africa and also presented African art works, literature, religion and music to the universe. The history of FESTAC can be traced back to the 1940s when certain ideas were developed on Pan-Africanism and Negritude by the Senegalese president, Leopold Sedar Senghor, Aime Casaire and some others.

The Festac 77 was the largest pan-African gathering during the period it took place. Nigeria was called upon to host the second Festac festival after the end of the first one which was held in Dakar, Senegal (1st to 24th of April, 1966). The festival was to take place in 1970, but due to the Nigerian civil war that broke out (1967-1970), the festival was postponed to 1977. The Festac 77 festival was attended by about 17,000 people from 56 African nations. The festival paved way for the construction of the Festac Town/Village in Lagos and the National Theatre, Iganmu, Lagos. The Nigerian government built the Festac Village to accommodate the 17,000 and above participants. The main reason the Festac Village was built was to cut the accommodation problem and pressure Lagos was likely to face.

Festac77 emblem

The celebration of the festival commenced at 9 a.m on the 15th of January, 1977. The opening ceremony took place inside the National Stadium, Surulere, Lagos, where many participants held a parade to welcome visiting dignitaries and the Nigerian Head of State, Olusegun Obasanjo. The Festac 77 festival has the royal ivory mask of Benin as its emblem. A shango priest entertained the crowd by setting the festival bowl aflame and a thousand Pigeons were released to signify the liberation and oneness of the Black nations.
Several drama and music shows were staged at the Tafawa Balewa Square in the afternoons and evenings. musicians like Miriam Makeba from South Africa, Stevie Wonder, Louis Moholo, The Sun Ra Arkestral and so on rocked musical concerts sending their numerous fans dancing wild to their songs.

A musical show during festac77

Several countries showcased their artworks at the National Theatre, at the Nigerian National Museum and some places around the Tafawa Balewa Square.
At the Square, each country represented at the festival was given a booth to exhibit their paintings, musical instruments, woven cloths, books and art objects. Some other notable exhbitons that took place were Africa and the Origin of Man, which was held at the National Theatre, and Ekpo Eyo’s 2000 Years of Nigerian Art, which included Nok terracottas, Benin court art, Igbo Ukwu, Ife and Tsoede bronzes and art objects.

Another exhilarating event at the FESTAC 77 festival is the boat regatta held at the Queen’s Drive Foreshore in Ikoyi, Lagos, which lasted for three days. The participants of the boat regatta were mainly from Nigerian states such as Ondo, Ogun, Lagos, Imo, Edo, Kwara, etc. More than 250 boats full of acrobats, masquerades and musicians displayed at the occasion.

USA Festac77

The Festac 77 participants also made a trip to Kaduna to witness the Dubar festival which took place for three days. There was a gallant display of horse riding, dancing of the Bida Masqurades, blowing of the Kakaki trumpets and many more.

Here are the countries that attended the Festac 77 festival:-
Kenya, Zaire, Congo, Benin, Cameroon, Gabon, Mauritius, Niger, Somalia, Equatorial Guinea, Egypt, Malagasy, Mauritania, Botswana, Lesotho, Chad, Central Africa, Upper Volta, Morocco, Angola, Senegal, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Ghana, Libya, Zambia, Togo, Guinea-Bissau, Sudan, Algeria, Mali, Sierra Leone, Tunisia, Liberia, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Tanzania, Uganda and Gambia. Some South American countries were also present at the festival, e.g Guyana, Cuba, Haiti, Brazil. Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados and so on represented the Caribbean. The United states also sent their representatives from different countries.

Festac77

An anthem was written for FESTAC 77 by Margaret Walker from Alabama, USA, while the music was produced by Akin Euba from Nigeria.
Here is the lyrics of the Festac 77 anthem titled, For My People.

FESTAC ’77 Anthem

1] Let a new earth arise
Let another world be born
Let a bloody peace
Be written in the sky.

Refrain: Festac 77 is here

2] Let a second generation
Full of courage issue forth
Let a people loving freedom
Come to growth

Refrain: Festac 77 is here

3] Let a beauty full of healing
And strength of final clenching
be the pulsing in our spirits
And our blood

Refrain: Festac 77 is here

4] Let the martial songs be written
Let the dirges disappear
Let the race of men now rise
And take control

Refrain: Festac 77 is here

The FESTAC 77 will forever remain a remarkable celebration in the history of Nigeria.

Lawrence Anini- Nigeria’s Most Notorious Armed Robber

Lawrencen Anini

Lawrence Nomayagbon Anini aka ‘the law’ was born in 1960, the same year Nigeria gained her independence, to the families of Owuo quarters in Orogbo village, Orhionmwon area, about 20 miles from Benin city, the capital of Bendel, presently Edo State. The 26-year-old robber kingpin terrorized the nook and cranny of Benin city and some other neighboring towns, unleashing havoc on the civilians, police and Continue reading Lawrence Anini- Nigeria’s Most Notorious Armed Robber

The Ibadan-Ijaye War (1861-1862)

Olumo Rock In Abeokuta, Ogun State

The Ibadan-Ijaye war broke out in 1861 between Ibadan and Ijaye over who to succeed the old Oyo empire as the political head of Yorubaland. The two rebelling towns sprang up from the ruins of the Old Oyo empire which was destroyed in 1836 by the Fulanis. Ibadan, Ijaye and the new Oyo, also called Oyo Atiba, succeeded the Old Oyo empire after its destruction. According to Latisosa, a Balogun of Ibadanland who fought in the war, Continue reading The Ibadan-Ijaye War (1861-1862)

Mungo Park In West Africa

 

Mungo Park in West Africa
Mungo Park

 

The ball was now on the feet of a young Scotsman, to see whether he could succeed where his predecessors had failed. This man was Mungo Park, who was one of the greatest explorers in the history of African exploration. He made two journeys. The first was in 1795 when he Continue reading Mungo Park In West Africa

Usman Dan Fodio (1754-1817)

Usman Dan Fodio

Usman Dan Fodio, born in 1754 to a Torokawa parents, was the leader of the greatest Jihad in Nigeria and West Africa. He studied law, theology and philosophy in Agades under a man called Umar. The study of these subjects inspired him to accept the religion of Islam. Usman Dan Fodio migrated to Gobir after completing his school in Agades. In Gobir, paganism was mixed with Islam which really irritated and infuriated Usman Dan Fodio, and he began to Continue reading Usman Dan Fodio (1754-1817)

The West African Students’ Union (WASU, 1925)

WASU

The West African Sudents’ Union (WASU) was founded on August 7 1925, in London, by a group of twenty one law students led by Ladipo Solanke and Herbert Bankole Bright.
WASU was an association of London- based students from West African countries with the purpose of promoting political research and uniting West Africans overseas. The main aims of WASU was to fight for the independence of West African countries and to put an end to racial discrimination  which as at then was climbing its peak.

The West African Students’ Union came into existence from the activities of earlier student organizations such as the Union of Students of African Descent, Gold Coast Students’ Association and the Nigerian Progressive Union founded by Ladipo Solanke and Amy Ashwood Garvey in July 1924 in London.

Ladipo Solanke was the founder and secretary-general of WASU while J.B. Danquah served as the first president of the union. Joseph Ephraim Casley Hayford, the pioneer of the National Congress of British West Africa (NCBWA), was made the patron of WASU, and with his post he promoted African nationalism among West Africans.

In 1926, WASU began the publication of a journal known as ‘WASU’ which circulated round Europe and Africa as well. The union also published a lot of other pamphlets which had great influence on West Africans abroad and at home.

In 1929, with the support of the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB), WASU was able to successfully stop the project of an African village exhibition in Newcastle on the ground that it will lead to the exploitation of some African communities.

Ladipo Solanke established more than 25 branches of WASU in Nigeria, Gold Coast (Ghana), Sierra Leone and other West African Countries. The West African Students’ Union also succeeded in given birth to some unions and movements in Africa, such as, The Gold Coast Youth Conference and the National Union of Nigerian Students and so on. Some members of WASU were also prominent members and administrators of The Nigerian Youth Movement (NYM), a political party founded in 1935.

In 1949, Ladipo Solanke stepped down as the secretary general of WASU due to some misunderstandings that erupted among the members of the union. WASU however existed and remained active till the 1960s.

CONTRIBUTIONS/ ACHIEVEMENTS OF WASU

1. WASU strived hard in promoting racial equality and self determination among the people.

2. WASU served as an intermediary or a link between the parliament in Britain and West African leaders.

3. The union succeeded in uniting West Africans in the United Kingdom.

4. The West African Students’ Union arouse nationalism among West Africans.

5. WASU proved itself to be a training ground for West African leaders and intellectuals. E.g Kwame Nkruma of Ghana

A WASU project (www.wasuproject.org.uk) is currently going on which included the production of a film documenting the history of West Africans in Britain.

Image Credit: wasuproject.org.uk

The National Union of Nigerian Students (NUNS, 1956)

The National Union of Nigerian Students

The National Union of Nigerian Students (NUNS), founded in 1956, was a union that brought together Nigerian students at home and abroad.
NUNS was a branch of the West African Students’ Union (WASU) founded by Ladipo Solanke and Herbert Bright Bankole in 1925.
The union actively opposed the policies of the government on so many issues about Nigeria’s education system, the rights of students in Nigeria and many more.
In April 1978, The National Union of Nigerian Students (NUNS) fully participated in many campus protests across the nation against the increasement of university fees. More than twenty students were seriously injured and killed by the police and army sent to drive the protesting students away. As a result of this, the Federal Military Government closed down three universities and imposed a ban on NUNS. Later on, several university students and officials were dismissed.

 

In 1980, The National Association of Nigerian Students (NANS) was founded as a replacement for the banned NUNS. Two years earlier, in May 1986, over fifteen students of Ahmadu Bello University were killed by the police during a protest over the observation of the “Ali Must Go Day” (Ali was the then minister of education) in memory of the students massacred in the 1979 protest. This resulted into the FGM closing down nine out of the fifteen universities in Nigeria.
The National Association of Nigerian Students was also banned in 1986 after a student riot calling for the dismissals of the government and some police officials.

The Clifford Constitution of 1922

Sir hugh clifford

 

Click here to read the Merits And Demerits of Clifford Constitution of 1922

 

The Clifford Constitution of 1922 disposed the Nigerian Council of Lord Lugard (1914) and set up a new legislative council for the Southern Protectorate. The membership of the Clifford legislative council was 46. Twenty- seven out of the 46 members were officials while 19 were unofficial members. Ten out of the 19 unofficial members were Nigerians and out of the 10 unofficial Nigerians, 4 were elected, 3 from Lagos and 1 from Calabar. Continue reading The Clifford Constitution of 1922

Nigerian Youth Movement (NYM, 1935)

Eyo Ita Esua

The Nigerian Youth Movement (NYM) was founded in 1935 after the introduction of the Clifford constitution of 1922 which paved way for the formation of political parties in Nigeria. Prof. Eyo Ita Esua was known to be the founding father of NYM, and other characters like Earnest Ikoli, the first editor of the Daily Times of Nigeria (1926), Samuel Akinsanya and Dr. C. Vaughan were founding members. NYM competed for the political control of Lagos with Nigerian National Democratic Party (NNDP) which was founded by Herbert Macaulay. Continue reading Nigerian Youth Movement (NYM, 1935)

Political Parties in the Second Republic of Nigeria

 

Unity Party of NigeriaThe presidential system of government practiced in the Second Republic of Nigeria (1979-1983) favored the existence of a multi-party system. The then Electoral commission of Nigeria, the Federal Electoral Commission (FEDECO), registered five political parties out of about 52 parties that showed up for the 1979 general elections which was to usher in the second Republic in Nigeria. The five political parties registered for the 1979 general elections were: Continue reading Political Parties in the Second Republic of Nigeria

Top 10 Things You Should Know In The History Of Nigeria

Nigerian Flag

As a Nigerian or a foreigner who is intrested in Nigeria and her history, here are the top 10 things you should know in the history of the nation called Nigeria.

1. The British came to Nigeria in 1851, annexed Lagos in 1861 and established the Oil River Protectorate in 1884.

2. Flora Louisa Shaw, a British journalist, novelist and a wife to Lord Frederick Lugard suggested the Name Nigeria for the British Protectorate on the Niger in “The Times of London magazine” on the 8th of January, 1897.

3. Zungeru, in Northern Nigeria,was the first Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria (1900-1914)
Continue reading Top 10 Things You Should Know In The History Of Nigeria

The plane thet first flew over Lagos

The First Aeroplane Seen Flying Over Lagos- May 30 1926

The plane thet first flew over Lagos

On the 30th of May, 1926, a French aeroplane was seen flying over the city of Lagos. It was a sunny Sunday  afternoon, the pilot was one Mr M. Landrich who had a passenger on board. The aeroplane took off at Elizabeth Vile, in the Congo and landed at Duala with the intention of Continue reading The First Aeroplane Seen Flying Over Lagos- May 30 1926